Today is brought to you by the letter C

This is the one that I know people are waiting for, I have been asked, how are you going to write around this? Well it’s easy really in farming you either are one or you’re not. Many people react to being called the c word and yes it can be insulting and degrading and it certainly needs to be defended when the title is aimed at you.

There are many things on farm and off farm that earn this title and it can be said out of the blue or sometimes on people’s faces you can see it coming. I have heard it slip out in general conversations and quickly glossed over with an apology or ignored. It brings shock to people’s faces regardless of the situation and the spruker.

Farming brings with it many a thing starting with c, I immediately think of our lovely cattle, they too on occasions have been known to be c’s. they can walk up the race wrong, they can jump fences, eat energisers, break fences, find their way back to their mothers and yell loudly when being mark and tagged (requirements under law). But they are really gentle curious creatures with whom we treat with kindness, compassion and slight fear.

We have the CFS whom are fantastic volunteers that risk their lives for others to help save property, animals and vegetation. My husband is one and we have been through two fires together on the farm that have luckily only destroyed fencing and crop. Croping is another c word that can bring out the ire in a farmer, on a tractor / air seeder / boom spray / day and night, sore hips, knees, necks and these things ache for over 2 to 3 weeks and those around them know about it. Then we can throw the combine harvester into the mix, this machine is used with the reaping of all crops and is a dangerous tool in the hands of amateurs and farmers. They can cause fires, catch on fire and cost large amounts of money to maintain them.

Lets not forget the cats & chooks who live on farms, useful animals, chooks for eggs and cats to catch mice, rats and company. We have 4 cats that have all been caught by my husband as kittens in the freezing cold of winter, the first 3 he used to use welding gloves to pick them up and pat them as they were so feral, now they are house bound and quite nice cats. Gatsby the 1 year addition to Caloundra Station (our property) never had the feral scratches he found warmth and food on his first night and decided not to go.

Today we are going out to plant 2000 trees and no doubt at some stage the c word will rear its ugly head. Regardless of what people say we live in the COUNTRY, the COUNTRY throws obstacles much like the CITY. Call me what you like but never a COUNTRY BUMPKIN, now what were you all thinking I was going to write?

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